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The emperor shrimp develops a symbiotic relationship with a range of nudibranchs and holothurians, or sea cucumbers. The shrimp lives on the surface of the host, which offers him protection from predators and an extra source of food. The relationship benefits the host, as the shrimp consumes any parasites on its skin. The shrimp doesn’t stay still, but constantly moves up and down his host, looking for food from the substrate or that has been disturbed by the host. (Photograph: Luca Gialdini)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

The emperor shrimp develops a symbiotic relationship with a range of nudibranchs and holothurians, or sea cucumbers. The shrimp lives on the surface of the host, which offers him protection from predators and an extra source of food. The relationship benefits the host, as the shrimp consumes any parasites on its skin. The shrimp doesn’t stay still, but constantly moves up and down his host, looking for food from the substrate or that has been disturbed by the host. (Photograph: Luca Gialdini)

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Another group of creatures that will sprout up from the muck at night are the feathered sea pens. Named for their resemblance to an antique quill pen, these creatures are related to corals. By day, they stay buried in the sand, then emerge to bloom after dark, deploying their feather-like feeding tentacles. Although they are extremely delicate, if touched very gently, sea pens will emit a bright greenish light or bioluminescence. They may also force water out of themselves as a defensive act, deflating and retreating into their peduncle. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Another group of creatures that will sprout up from the muck at night are the feathered sea pens. Named for their resemblance to an antique quill pen, these creatures are related to corals. By day, they stay buried in the sand, then emerge to bloom after dark, deploying their feather-like feeding tentacles. Although they are extremely delicate, if touched very gently, sea pens will emit a bright greenish light or bioluminescence. They may also force water out of themselves as a defensive act, deflating and retreating into their peduncle. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)

2 notes

Sometimes, appearances can be deceiving. In the case of the saber-toothed blenny, this means taking on the look and mannerisms of a cleaner wrasse, right down to the “cleaning dance” wrasses use to advertise their services. When a fish glides up to what appears to be a cleaning station, the saber-tooth makes its move. But instead of harmlessly picking parasites, it darts in and takes a bite with its oversized front teeth, then flees. This bad behavior can affect other species of blennies, which are sometimes attacked by fish who have been previously fooled by the saber-tooth. (Photograph: Imran Ahmad)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Sometimes, appearances can be deceiving. In the case of the saber-toothed blenny, this means taking on the look and mannerisms of a cleaner wrasse, right down to the “cleaning dance” wrasses use to advertise their services. When a fish glides up to what appears to be a cleaning station, the saber-tooth makes its move. But instead of harmlessly picking parasites, it darts in and takes a bite with its oversized front teeth, then flees. This bad behavior can affect other species of blennies, which are sometimes attacked by fish who have been previously fooled by the saber-tooth. (Photograph: Imran Ahmad)

2 notes

Sea Stars have remarkable regenerative powers, when attacked and damaged by predators they are able to grow new arms. They possess a cleverly evolved arsenal of hydraulic tube feet connected to an elaborate water-vascular system that encircles the animal’s mouth and extends via five radial canals down the centre of each arm. (Photograph: Mick Gulson)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Sea Stars have remarkable regenerative powers, when attacked and damaged by predators they are able to grow new arms. They possess a cleverly evolved arsenal of hydraulic tube feet connected to an elaborate water-vascular system that encircles the animal’s mouth and extends via five radial canals down the centre of each arm. (Photograph: Mick Gulson)

As the common name suggests, it is a dark reddish brown colour, fading into pink on the undersides, with a scattering of white spots and blotches. Conspicuous eyes sit behind a large, gaping jaw with an array of strong, slender teeth, used to rasp at prey. (Photograph: Wayne MacWilliams)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

As the common name suggests, it is a dark reddish brown colour, fading into pink on the undersides, with a scattering of white spots and blotches. Conspicuous eyes sit behind a large, gaping jaw with an array of strong, slender teeth, used to rasp at prey. (Photograph: Wayne MacWilliams)

On first blush this odd sea creature looks more like an insect or a water-logged bird than a fish! The Pegasus seamoth or dragonfish is a master of camouflage. It sports reef-tones colors, which they can change to better match the sea floor, and they will remain motionless on the substrate when threatened. The body is encased in a carapace that also provides some protection from predators. It has been suggested that they masquerade as pieces of debris, like broken seashells or dead plant material. (Photograph: Anne Lecuire)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

On first blush this odd sea creature looks more like an insect or a water-logged bird than a fish! The Pegasus seamoth or dragonfish is a master of camouflage. It sports reef-tones colors, which they can change to better match the sea floor, and they will remain motionless on the substrate when threatened. The body is encased in a carapace that also provides some protection from predators. It has been suggested that they masquerade as pieces of debris, like broken seashells or dead plant material. (Photograph: Anne Lecuire)

10 notes

The goatfishes are the grubbers of the reef. They use their chin barbels (long finger like projections under the mouth) to probe the sand as they search for the mollusks, worms and crustaceans that they feed on. While many goatfishes occur singly, the yellow-striped goatfish is a school-forming species. (Photograph: Mark Snyder)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

The goatfishes are the grubbers of the reef. They use their chin barbels (long finger like projections under the mouth) to probe the sand as they search for the mollusks, worms and crustaceans that they feed on. While many goatfishes occur singly, the yellow-striped goatfish is a school-forming species. (Photograph: Mark Snyder)

7 notes

Adult napoleon wrasses are predominantly green, with characteristic facial contours. The blues and greens exhibited by many wrasses have been found to provide perfect camouflage for them while living in reef habitats. When viewed horizontally by predators through the water column, they are almost indistinguishable from the background. These colors may also help render the fish invisible in shallow water from aerial attack by avian predators, such as sea eagles, when viewed from above. (Photograph: Richard Smith)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Adult napoleon wrasses are predominantly green, with characteristic facial contours. The blues and greens exhibited by many wrasses have been found to provide perfect camouflage for them while living in reef habitats. When viewed horizontally by predators through the water column, they are almost indistinguishable from the background. These colors may also help render the fish invisible in shallow water from aerial attack by avian predators, such as sea eagles, when viewed from above. (Photograph: Richard Smith)

4 notes

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