1 / 57

Next Page
Anemonefishes are found in close association with their anemones. When they swim, these less agile species use their pectoral fins more and tend to move in a more sinuous or exaggerated fashion than their relatives. They also spend more time among the anemone’s tentacles, rarely straying far from their host. When approached by a potential threat, these species are quick to seek shelter. (Photograph: Scott Michael)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Anemonefishes are found in close association with their anemones. When they swim, these less agile species use their pectoral fins more and tend to move in a more sinuous or exaggerated fashion than their relatives. They also spend more time among the anemone’s tentacles, rarely straying far from their host. When approached by a potential threat, these species are quick to seek shelter. (Photograph: Scott Michael)

2 notes

From spines to stingers, some marine animals such as the stingray position themselves ready for protection. If a predator comes too close, either touching its wings or making the ray feel threatened, the stingray will fling up his tail in a whip-like response, causing the spine to thrust into the “attacker” and releasing venom along with fragments of the stingray’s spine. (Photograph: Claude & Lolita Voirol)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

From spines to stingers, some marine animals such as the stingray position themselves ready for protection. If a predator comes too close, either touching its wings or making the ray feel threatened, the stingray will fling up his tail in a whip-like response, causing the spine to thrust into the “attacker” and releasing venom along with fragments of the stingray’s spine. (Photograph: Claude & Lolita Voirol)

4 notes

The reefs in Wakatobi are absolutely stunning and should not be forgotten by the wide-angle photographer. Walls that begin in shallow depths are covered in a diverse array of soft corals, sponges and gorgonians. The clear waters provide ample ambient light to showcase these vistas in vibrant detail. (Photograph: WDR)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

The reefs in Wakatobi are absolutely stunning and should not be forgotten by the wide-angle photographer. Walls that begin in shallow depths are covered in a diverse array of soft corals, sponges and gorgonians. The clear waters provide ample ambient light to showcase these vistas in vibrant detail. (Photograph: WDR)

2 notes

Magic Pier looks like a garden spot - discarded barrels, old tires and abandoned fish traps litter the seabed. But, as you get closer, you find this detritus is teeming with life. Blue ribbon and garden eels poke their snouts into the sunlight; nudibranchs slither about and gobies stay on the watch as their roommate, the blind shrimp, pushes sand and debris out of the burrow they share. (Photograph: David Gray)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Magic Pier looks like a garden spot - discarded barrels, old tires and abandoned fish traps litter the seabed. But, as you get closer, you find this detritus is teeming with life. Blue ribbon and garden eels poke their snouts into the sunlight; nudibranchs slither about and gobies stay on the watch as their roommate, the blind shrimp, pushes sand and debris out of the burrow they share. (Photograph: David Gray)

1 note

Fish such as damselfishes, triggerfish, anemonefishes, gobies, blennies and other similar species, will lay their eggs on the bottom (some will build a nest in advance) and attach them to the substrate (or solid bottom) like the cluster seen here. Nest builders are rare on the reef but fascinating to watch; they are highly industrious as they clear a site of all algae and debris and fiercely guard it. They are also protective parents after the eggs are deposited, and they will continue to guard the burrow until the eggs hatch. (Photograph: Richard Smith)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Fish such as damselfishes, triggerfish, anemonefishes, gobies, blennies and other similar species, will lay their eggs on the bottom (some will build a nest in advance) and attach them to the substrate (or solid bottom) like the cluster seen here. Nest builders are rare on the reef but fascinating to watch; they are highly industrious as they clear a site of all algae and debris and fiercely guard it. They are also protective parents after the eggs are deposited, and they will continue to guard the burrow until the eggs hatch. (Photograph: Richard Smith)

2 notes

"Two more fin kicks bring you to a small pile of rubble, which seems to be having periodic eruptions of sand. It’s a yellow barred jawfish, using its’ mouth to excavate a burrow. It eyes you warily from the mouth of the tunnel, then, disappears inside." (Photograph: WDR)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

"Two more fin kicks bring you to a small pile of rubble, which seems to be having periodic eruptions of sand. It’s a yellow barred jawfish, using its’ mouth to excavate a burrow. It eyes you warily from the mouth of the tunnel, then, disappears inside." (Photograph: WDR)

Sometimes, appearances can be deceiving. In the case of the saber-toothed blenny, this means taking on the look and mannerisms of a cleaner wrasse, right down to the “cleaning dance” wrasses use to advertise their services. When a fish glides up to what appears to be a cleaning station, the saber-tooth makes its move. But instead of harmlessly picking parasites, it darts in and takes a bite with its oversized front teeth, then flees. This bad behavior can affect other species of blennies, which are sometimes attacked by fish who have been previously fooled by the saber-tooth. (Photograph: Rob Darmanin)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Sometimes, appearances can be deceiving. In the case of the saber-toothed blenny, this means taking on the look and mannerisms of a cleaner wrasse, right down to the “cleaning dance” wrasses use to advertise their services. When a fish glides up to what appears to be a cleaning station, the saber-tooth makes its move. But instead of harmlessly picking parasites, it darts in and takes a bite with its oversized front teeth, then flees. This bad behavior can affect other species of blennies, which are sometimes attacked by fish who have been previously fooled by the saber-tooth. (Photograph: Rob Darmanin)

1 note

Fish can use color patterns to mimic their surroundings and create camouflage. Sometimes, these patterns are so elaborate that they become art. The tasseled scorpionfish has evolved to look like a part of something growing on the sea floor. But its flamboyant coloration and elaborate fin appendages are so vivid that they almost seem to defeat the initial purpose of not standing out. (Photograph: Enrico Witte)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Fish can use color patterns to mimic their surroundings and create camouflage. Sometimes, these patterns are so elaborate that they become art. The tasseled scorpionfish has evolved to look like a part of something growing on the sea floor. But its flamboyant coloration and elaborate fin appendages are so vivid that they almost seem to defeat the initial purpose of not standing out. (Photograph: Enrico Witte)

1 note

Jump prev Jump next