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On first blush this odd sea creature looks more like an insect or a water-logged bird than a fish! The Pegasus seamoth or dragonfish is a master of camouflage. It sports reef-tones colors, which they can change to better match the sea floor, and they will remain motionless on the substrate when threatened. The body is encased in a carapace that also provides some protection from predators. It has been suggested that they masquerade as pieces of debris, like broken seashells or dead plant material. (Photograph: Anne Lecuire)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

On first blush this odd sea creature looks more like an insect or a water-logged bird than a fish! The Pegasus seamoth or dragonfish is a master of camouflage. It sports reef-tones colors, which they can change to better match the sea floor, and they will remain motionless on the substrate when threatened. The body is encased in a carapace that also provides some protection from predators. It has been suggested that they masquerade as pieces of debris, like broken seashells or dead plant material. (Photograph: Anne Lecuire)

7 notes

The goatfishes are the grubbers of the reef. They use their chin barbels (long finger like projections under the mouth) to probe the sand as they search for the mollusks, worms and crustaceans that they feed on. While many goatfishes occur singly, the yellow-striped goatfish is a school-forming species. (Photograph: Mark Snyder)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

The goatfishes are the grubbers of the reef. They use their chin barbels (long finger like projections under the mouth) to probe the sand as they search for the mollusks, worms and crustaceans that they feed on. While many goatfishes occur singly, the yellow-striped goatfish is a school-forming species. (Photograph: Mark Snyder)

5 notes

Adult napoleon wrasses are predominantly green, with characteristic facial contours. The blues and greens exhibited by many wrasses have been found to provide perfect camouflage for them while living in reef habitats. When viewed horizontally by predators through the water column, they are almost indistinguishable from the background. These colors may also help render the fish invisible in shallow water from aerial attack by avian predators, such as sea eagles, when viewed from above. (Photograph: Richard Smith)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Adult napoleon wrasses are predominantly green, with characteristic facial contours. The blues and greens exhibited by many wrasses have been found to provide perfect camouflage for them while living in reef habitats. When viewed horizontally by predators through the water column, they are almost indistinguishable from the background. These colors may also help render the fish invisible in shallow water from aerial attack by avian predators, such as sea eagles, when viewed from above. (Photograph: Richard Smith)

2 notes

Young Batfish are known to mimic things in their environment to avoid being detected by predators. The Juvenile Pinnate Batfish resembles a polyclad flatworm in shape, in color, and locomotion. While juvenile pinnate batfish are solitary creatures, as they grow, they sometimes form small shoals that roam the reef and feed together. (Photograph: WDR)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Young Batfish are known to mimic things in their environment to avoid being detected by predators. The Juvenile Pinnate Batfish resembles a polyclad flatworm in shape, in color, and locomotion. While juvenile pinnate batfish are solitary creatures, as they grow, they sometimes form small shoals that roam the reef and feed together. (Photograph: WDR)

4 notes

The striped shrimpfish is remarkable for its strange body shape and swimming habits. It has a straight, sleek, razor-like body with one long, sharp spine and two shorter spines at the end of the body. The dorsal (back) and caudal (tail) fins are found below these spines. The shrimpfish’s elongated, slender body is encased in an armor of thin and transparent bony plates. Body length up to 17 cm. Wine red on top and dark yellow underneath, with a black longitudinal band and three silver spots on both sides of each bony plate. (Photograph: Rod Klein)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

The striped shrimpfish is remarkable for its strange body shape and swimming habits. It has a straight, sleek, razor-like body with one long, sharp spine and two shorter spines at the end of the body. The dorsal (back) and caudal (tail) fins are found below these spines. The shrimpfish’s elongated, slender body is encased in an armor of thin and transparent bony plates. Body length up to 17 cm. Wine red on top and dark yellow underneath, with a black longitudinal band and three silver spots on both sides of each bony plate. (Photograph: Rod Klein)

6 notes

Twilight deepens, and the world fades to gray then black, marking the start of the witching hour. Once-vivid colors become muted, and as shadows lengthen, perceptions of distance and moment are likewise diminished. This is a time when some residents of the reef become more vulnerable, while others turn twilight to their advantage, and emerge to begin the hunt. (Photograph: Lionel Pozzoli)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Twilight deepens, and the world fades to gray then black, marking the start of the witching hour. Once-vivid colors become muted, and as shadows lengthen, perceptions of distance and moment are likewise diminished. This is a time when some residents of the reef become more vulnerable, while others turn twilight to their advantage, and emerge to begin the hunt. (Photograph: Lionel Pozzoli)

14 notes

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