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We all love the looks of a pufferfish when it pumps up like a squeeze toy; even giant pufferfish, like this one, are cute and cuddly when they show their toothy grin. But have you ever wondered why such adorable, slow moving fish are not on everyone’s dinner menu? When the fish inflates, it becomes difficult for a predator to fit the puffer into its mouth. (Photograph: Wayne MacWIlliams)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

We all love the looks of a pufferfish when it pumps up like a squeeze toy; even giant pufferfish, like this one, are cute and cuddly when they show their toothy grin. But have you ever wondered why such adorable, slow moving fish are not on everyone’s dinner menu? When the fish inflates, it becomes difficult for a predator to fit the puffer into its mouth. (Photograph: Wayne MacWIlliams)

Flatworm really is as flat as a leaf, and seems to glide with a rippling motion over the rocks and sand. Did you know that flatworms have only the most rudimentary of eyes, which allow them to detect the presence of light, but little else. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Flatworm really is as flat as a leaf, and seems to glide with a rippling motion over the rocks and sand. Did you know that flatworms have only the most rudimentary of eyes, which allow them to detect the presence of light, but little else. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)

1 note

The moray eel is a relatively secretive animal, spending much of its time hiding in holes and crevices amongst the rocks and coral on the ocean floor. By spending the majority of their time hiding, moray eels are able to remain out of sight from predators and are also able to ambush any unsuspecting prey that passes. (Photograph: Mark Snyder)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

The moray eel is a relatively secretive animal, spending much of its time hiding in holes and crevices amongst the rocks and coral on the ocean floor. By spending the majority of their time hiding, moray eels are able to remain out of sight from predators and are also able to ambush any unsuspecting prey that passes. (Photograph: Mark Snyder)

During the transformation of day into night many of the reef’s predators become most active in the hunt for their next meal. Under and around the jetty bar is a small group of red lionfish that make good use of the lights from the bar above, allowing them to extend their forays as small fish and other assorted tiny marine creatures are drawn to the glow overhead. (Photograph: Jim Laurel)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

During the transformation of day into night many of the reef’s predators become most active in the hunt for their next meal. Under and around the jetty bar is a small group of red lionfish that make good use of the lights from the bar above, allowing them to extend their forays as small fish and other assorted tiny marine creatures are drawn to the glow overhead. (Photograph: Jim Laurel)

Sea Turtles can live to be 100 years old, but most don’t survive their first few days. In the wild, the tiny hatchlings typically encounter a gauntlet of predators as they hatch and make their way from beachside nests to open water, and they remain especially vulnerable those first few months of life. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

Sea Turtles can live to be 100 years old, but most don’t survive their first few days. In the wild, the tiny hatchlings typically encounter a gauntlet of predators as they hatch and make their way from beachside nests to open water, and they remain especially vulnerable those first few months of life. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)

7 notes

You may not think so but sponges actually have skeletons. Their skeleton is made up of a network of tiny glass like structures called spicules. Unlike corals, when sponges die their skeletons dissolve back into the water. While corals leave a solid skeleton for other things to grow on, a sponge’s skeleton will rapidly break down and become part of the bottom sediment. (Photograph: Wayne MacWilliams)
Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Nikon D2xs
  • 160
  • f/9
  • 1/100th
  • 17mm

You may not think so but sponges actually have skeletons. Their skeleton is made up of a network of tiny glass like structures called spicules. Unlike corals, when sponges die their skeletons dissolve back into the water. While corals leave a solid skeleton for other things to grow on, a sponge’s skeleton will rapidly break down and become part of the bottom sediment. (Photograph: Wayne MacWilliams)

3 notes

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